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British Values Statement

 

Promotion of British values

At Cornerstone School we recognise not only the importance of allowing students to flourish academically but we also embrace our wider role in preparing them for their adult life beyond the formal examined curriculum, in their local community and as global citizens. Part of our role in that preparation is ensuring that we promote and reinforce British values to our students.

The government set out its definition of British values in the 2015 Prevent Strategy and considered them to be democracy, rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs. At Cornerstone School these values are reinforced in a pervasive manner and permeate the school community.

The examples that follow are an indication of some of the many ways we seek to embed British values at Cornerstone School and should be seen as an indication of our approach rather than an exhaustive list.

Democracy

At Cornerstone School the principle of democracy is consistently reinforced. As we grow the democratic process will be employed for important decisions within the school community, for instance, through a  school government. The principle of democracy is explored in History, Cornerstone Curriculum and Religious Studies as well as in wellbeing and assemblies. Students will also be encouraged to participate in the school’s mock elections that take place alongside national elections.

The rule of law

The importance of laws, whether they be those that govern the class, the school, or the country, are consistently reinforced throughout regular school days, as well as when dealing with behaviour and through school assemblies and our Cornerstone Curriculum programme of study. Students are taught the values and reasons behind laws, that they govern and protect us, the responsibilities that this involves and the consequences when laws are broken.

Individual liberty

Within Cornerstone School students are actively encouraged to make independent choices knowing that they are in a safe, secure and supportive environment. As a school we educate and provide boundaries for students to make choices safely, through the provision of a safe environment and an empowering education. Students are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights, responsibilities and personal freedoms and receive advice about how to exercise these safely, for example through our exploration of E-Safety with National Online Safety membership in Computing and their Wellbeing activities. By the end of our first year we aim to be an accredited Rights Respecting School (UNICEF).

Mutual respect

Respect is at the core of our school ethos and is modelled by students and staff alike. The school promotes respect for others and this is reiterated through our classroom and learning environments. We foster an environment where students are safe to disagree with each other. Mutual respect is embraced throughout the curriculum from the concept of ‘fair play’ in PE to discussions in humanities.

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs

This is achieved through equipping students with the ability to understand their place in a culturally diverse society and by giving them opportunities to experience such diversity within the school community. Students are actively encouraged to share their faith and beliefs within the school. Our Religious Studies curriculum provides a broad and balanced education on a range of faiths, religions and cultures.

Links with Unicef Rights Respecting Schools

Mutual respect: UNCRC Article 2:  The Convention applies to everyone whatever their race, religion, abilities, whatever they think or say and whatever type of family they come from.

 

Democracy: UNCRC Article 12:  Children have the right to say what they think should happen, when adults are making decisions that affect them, and to have their opinions taken into account.

 

Tolerance of different faiths and beliefs: UNCRC Article 14:  Children have the right to think and believe what they want, and to practise their religion, as long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights. Parents should guide their children on these matters.

 

UNCRC Article 15:  Children have the right to meet together and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.

 

The rule of law: UNCRC Article 19: Governments should ensure that children are properly cared for, and protect them from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else who looks after them.

 

UNCRC Article 30: Children have a right to learn and use the language and customs of their families, whether these are shared by the majority of people in the country or not.

 

Individual Liberty: UNCRC Article 31:  All children have a right to relax and play, and to join in a wide range of activities.

 

 

 

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